Tag Archives: ALP

Whitlam

Why didn’t neoliberalism start during the Fraser Government

Many people associate the beginning of neoliberalism with the election of conservative governments influenced by the New Right and theorists such as Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. A useful question to ask, then, is why didn’t the vanguard neoliberal period commence during Australia’s conservative Liberal government (1975-1983) led by Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser? One explanation […]

Gramsci

Travels with Gramsci

This post was first published at Progress in Political Economy, the blog of the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. Click here for the audio of my talk on Soundcloud. *** Some paths to an event seem particularly labyrinthine, which only adds to the joy once a project reaches an unexpected destination. […]

Hawke and Keating

Neoliberalism and the Accord: 3CR podcast

The 14th Biennial National Labour History Conference, ‘Fighting Against War: Peace Activism in the Twentieth Century’ was held at Queen’s College, University of Melbourne, 11-13 February 2015. My paper on ‘The Accord after Thirty Years: Corporatism in the Neoliberal Era‘ was recorded by the Solidarity Breakfast program on 3CR, who featured excerpts from it as a part […]

FILE: Baroness Thatcher Dies Aged 87 - Thatcher On The World Stage

Klein’s ‘shock doctrine’ thesis & the Whitlam dismissal

Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine (2007) is one of the most widely read critical accounts of neoliberalism. Klein argues that governments have used ‘disasters’ of various kinds to implement neoliberal policies. Transformation occurs through ‘eventful temporality’, where moments of ‘coups, crisis, and shocks…usher in neoliberal policies’ transforming ‘existing modes of public administration and resource allocation’ […]

under the carpet

Neoliberalism’s Dominant Narrative

Use of the term ‘neoliberalism’ is widespread in the social sciences. While debates have raged since the 2008 economic crisis as to whether neoliberalism persists or has faltered, many argue it remains ‘the mode of existence of contemporary capitalism’ (Saad-Filho 2010, 242). Use of the term has, however, often obscured its meaning. For example, many […]

Roberts Shearers

Arbitration & the ALP: Union strength or impasse?

A class is dominant in two ways, namely it is ‘leading’ and ‘dominant.’ It leads the allied classes, it dominates the opposing classes. Therefore, a class can (and must) ‘lead’ before assuming power; and when it is in power it becomes dominant, but continues to lead. … There can and must be ‘political hegemony’ even before assuming government power, and in […]

qantas

How relevant are the unions?

Tad Tietze and I have an article on the state of the unions in the wake of the Qantas job cuts, which has been stirring up some discussion at The Guardian‘s Comment Is Free section. Here’s a preview, and you can read the full article here. It is no coincidence that the problems started during the Accord between the […]